Late on May 15, 2020, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) released its PPP loan Forgiveness Application (Forgiveness Application) for borrowers (Borrowers) under the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). While the SBA has still not yet released interim final rules and regulations relating to PPP loan forgiveness, the Forgiveness Application provides more details on several critical questions which have been plaguing Borrowers. Although the SBA has still not provided final rules and regulation relating to PPP loan forgiveness, the new PPP Forgiveness Application provides several key clarifications regarding how PPP loan forgiveness will be calculated. Below is a summary of key clarifications…
On Friday, the SBA published its Paycheck Protection Program Loan Forgiveness Application, which includes instructions for completing the application.  The application can be found here.  Of note, the application contains further information with respect to the timing of paying and incurring payroll costs as that relates to calculating the amount eligible for forgiveness.  Additionally, the application provides certain borrowers (those with biweekly or more frequent payroll periods) flexibility in terms of when the eight-week “covered period” begins. O’Neil, Cannon, Hollman, DeJong & Laing remains open and ready to help you. For questions or further information relating to the Paycheck…
Gov. Evers announced a new $75 million grant program for small businesses that will provide $2,500 grants to assist with the costs of business interruption, health and safety improvements, salaries, rent, mortgages, or inventory. The grants will be available to businesses impacted by COVID-19 with 20 or fewer full-time employees who have not already received COVID-19 assistance from the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC). The grant program will be administered by the WEDC as part of its its “We’re All In” initiative, and will begin taking applications in June. Grant recipients will also commit to using safety protocols for their…
Author: Attorney David E. SapersteinPhone: 608-257-0945Email: dsaperstein@hurleyburish.com This practical series, “Nuts and Bolts,” is intended to demystify the process of being charged with a crime in Wisconsin state (circuit) courts. The court process can be overwhelming. Knowing what to expect from the process may make it less confusing and unpredictable, and hopefully less stressful. Will I Be in Jail During My Case? — Bail and Pretrial Release Most accused persons are released from custody during the pendency of their cases, either by posting cash and/or by signing a court order promising to abide by certain conditions while the case is…
May 14, 2020 – Working from home is not new, but working from home during a global pandemic is not normal. Managing employees to meet or exceed standards under these conditions is equally difficult, but there are tools to help stay the course. The first step is to define what success looks like now.  For me, success involves healthy employees, ensuring business continuity, and meeting goals. In order to reach those goals in this moment, managers must adapt to changing operational conditions.  Determine which standards are flexible. Look at your employee’s office hours, projects, and deadlines. Speak with your employees…
The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) provides a refundable employee retention tax credit (ERC) for qualified wages paid by certain employers impacted by COVID-19. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) subsequently released comprehensive Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), with an updated list released on May 7, 2020, to address many of the open questions related to application of the ERC. The IRS has also released a draft of a new IRS Form 941, Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return, set to go into effect for the second quarter of 2020, to accommodate reporting for COVID-19-related payroll…
The president signed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act into law on March 27, 2020. Among its many provisions are significant modifications to the Public Health Services (PHS) Act,1 which contains the federal confidentiality protections currently afforded to substance use disorder (SUD) records. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will need to incorporate these changes into its regulations contained at 42 C.F.R. Part 2 (Part 2) through the standard rulemaking process, so it is yet to be seen how these changes will be implemented and enforced against SUD treatment programs subject to Part…
<!– ID Value sectionSlug landlord-tenant baseURL http://petriepettit.com perch_page_path /blog-post.php 0 image excerpt categories Array ( [0] => 12 [1] => 108 ) author_image /admin/resources/tpcandid8828.jpg 1 og_title The Wisconsin Supreme Court struck down Governor Evers’ Stay-At-Home Order, so I can send notices{…} og_description og_image og_type 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 itemID 496 postID 496 blogID 1 postTitle The Wisconsin Supreme Court Struck Down Governor Evers’ Stay-At-Home Order, So I Can Now Serve{…} postSlug the-wisconsin-supreme-court-struck-down-governor-evers-stay-at-home-order-so-i-can-now-serve-notices{…} postDateTime 2020-05-14 00:00:00 postDescRaw Written by Attorney Jennifer Hayden of Petrie + Pettit The Wisconsin Supreme Court struck…
On March 26, 2020, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a memorandum announcing that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, it would exercise enforcement discretion if regulated entities violated certain environmental obligations due to the pandemic. The press cast this temporary policy in dramatic headlines, such as The Hill’s article, “EPA suspends enforcement of environmental laws amid coronavirus.” The coverage was consistent with the broader narrative of the Trump administration’s ongoing work to limit the reach of certain environmental regulations, and the progressive weakening of EPA’s enforcement efforts. The temporary policy is less dramatic than the initial headlines…
In this image by Goya, a person, asleep at his drawing table, is besieged by creatures associated in Spanish folk tradition with mystery and evil. The title of the print, emblazoned on the front of the desk, is often read as a proclamation of Goya’s adherence to the values of the Enlightenment—without Reason, evil and corruption prevail. Wisconsin is now under an order from state government to “stay at home” to slow the spread of the new coronavirus.  It is not understatement this order has restricted the lives of people in unimaginable ways.  Gov. Tony Evers issued this order after hearing…
Wisconsin, like most of the country, has been under a “Safer at Home” order for almost eight weeks. However, the country is beginning to reopen and we are seeing plans for reopening both at the federal and state levels. In anticipation for this shift away from “Safer at Home,” employers must plan for the numerous issues that will inevitably arise during this transition. Comprehensive planning and communication in the time leading up to and during the return-to-work process will be key to ensuring a safe and productive reopening. Here, we outline the critical issues to be addressed. When and How…
This morning, the SBA issued much anticipated additional guidance with respect to the Paycheck Protection Program’s repayment safe harbor.  The new guidance provides significant clarity with respect to how the SBA will evaluate whether a borrower made the following certification in good faith when submitting its loan application: “Current economic uncertainty makes this loan request necessary to support the ongoing operations of the Applicant.” With the new guidance, the SBA makes clear that all borrowers receiving a loan of less than $2 million will be deemed to have made the certification in good faith.  Loans to borrowers and their affiliates…
A significant question for both practitioners and taxpayers is how COVID-19 will change tax practice before the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Many practitioners and clients have been concerned by what appears to be a partial shutdown of IRS services. The changes made by the IRS seem to be a step back from the Taxpayers First Act, which promised a new and more modern IRS, and as stimulus payments have been dispersed, the question arises: “What now?” IRS Partial Shutdown Because of COVID-19 In March 2020, the IRS, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, began closing all Taxpayer Assistance Centers. This…