Wisblawg

Legal Research News and Information with an Emphasis on Wisconsin

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When researching a legal issue, local laws are an often overlooked resource.  Municipal and county governments pass ordinances on a variety of topics, including administrative procedures, standards of conduct, and zoning.  Although many of these laws are available online through local government websites or through services such as eCode or municode, they can be difficult to locate.  Fortunately, the Wisconsin State Law Library has created a comprehensive guide to Wisconsin Ordinances and Codes. Some larger municipalities and counties enable you to delve even deeper into their legislation and legislative history.  Legistar from Granicus is a legislative management software used…
Who knew that you could borrow seeds from the Madison Public Library?  A lot of people, apparently.  So far this year, the Madison Public Library’s Seed Library has given away nearly 2,000 seed packets, including flowers, herbs, and produce seeds. Here’s a sampling of the seeds available at participating Madison libraries (Lakeview Library or Goodman South Madison Library): Bush Green Beans Beets Collards Cucumbers Flowers: Cosmos, Marigolds, Nasturtiums, Pansies, Sunflowers, Zinnias Herbs: Basil, Chives, Cilantro, Oregano, Parsley, Rosemary, Sage Kale (lacinato) Lettuce Melon: Cantaloupe, Watermelon Pie Pumpkin Radishes Spinach Squash: Butternut, Zucchini Sugarsnap Peas Peppers: Sweet bell type, Hot…
In response to concerns raised by the Citing Slavery Project, the Bluebook has made a rare between-edition change to rule 10.7.1 on citation to cases.  This change is reflected in the 2021 printing of The Bluebook Twenty-First Edition was first published in 2020. According to the Bluebook’s Noteworthy Changes to the 2021 Printing: Rule 10.7.1(d) now covers slave cases. For cases involving an enslaved person as a party, use the parenthetical “(enslaved party).” For cases involving an enslaved person as the subject of a property or other legal dispute but named as a party to the suit, use…
Reuters reports that Google will soon show its search engine users more information about why it found the results they are shown.  Users will be able to click into details such as how their result matched certain search terms, in order to better decide if the information is relevant. Google has been making changes to give users more context about the results its search engine provides. Earlier this year it introduced panels to tell users about the sources of the information they are seeing. It has also started warning users when a topic is rapidly evolving and search results might…
The UW Law Library has been creating beautiful READ Posters highlighting our amazing faculty as a part of National Library Week for the past 15 years.  Thanks to Covid, this year’s poster was delayed, but the wait was certainly worth it! This year, the poster features Professor Mitra Sharafi. Check it out below or visit the physical version at the entrance to the Law Library, where it hangs in a place of honor. Thanks for taking part, Mitra! This year’s poster, as well as many of other posters, was photographed by IT Director, Eric Giefer and designed and created…
On the latest episode of the WI Law in Action podcast from the UW Law Library, host Emma Babler interviews Sumudu Atapattu, Director of the Research Centers at UW Law School.  Atapattu discusses discusses her journey from Sri Lanka to UW-Madison and her passion for environmental law.  She also describes the new book that she edited and contributed to, “The Cambridge Handbook of Environmental Justice and Sustainable Development,” and its first chapter, “Intersections of Environmental Justice and Sustainable Development: Framing the Issues.”  Below are a few excerpts from our discussion. Atapattu on her background and interest in teaching and…
Here is the latest faculty scholarship appearing in the University of Wisconsin Law School Legal Studies Research Papers series found on SSRN. “Clinics at Wisconsin: Comprehensive, In-Depth Pedagogy and Bottom-Up Innovation”2021 Wisconsin Law Review 409 (2021) by KEITH A. FINDLEY and LOUISE G. TRUBEK, (UW Law) The University of Wisconsin Law School has been a pioneer in clinical education. Experiential education, involving actual legal advocacy and practice, started at Wisconsin in the 1970s before many U.S. law schools had even thought about what came to be called law school “clinics.” These initial efforts developed out of the Law…
As of July 1, electronic filing is mandatory for attorneys who practice in the Wisconsin Court of Appeals.  The Wisconsin Supreme Court will launch an eFiling pilot program on a select set of cases by invitation. According to the Wisconsin Court System News, the appellate eFiling system has the same look and feel as the eFiling system established for circuit courts.  A copy of the Supreme Court’s April 23 order, establishing a comprehensive appellate eFiling system, can be found here.  Additional information about appellate eFiling is available on the court system’s website. The Supreme Court has not…
Maximizing the scholarly access, impact, and visibility of our faculty is a core part of our mission at the UW Law Library.  Over the last few years, but especially since US News announced their new scholarly impact ranking in 2019, we developed a successful program to make faculty scholarship accessible online, improve scholarly impact, and promote the visibility of new scholarly works.  We recently developed a short video highlighting our program for the AALL Innovation Showcase.  Since only AALL members can view it through the showcase, we’ve made it publicly available on our YouTube channel in keeping with the…
Each year, UW–Madison honors university staff members for their outstanding dedication and commitment to excellence.  We are so pleased to share that our own Jay Tucker was one of the ten winners of the University Staff Recognition Award, chosen from over 100 nominations! Jay Tucker Stack Manager In regular times, Tucker coordinates and oversees the shelving of books in the library. In the early days of the pandemic, Tucker worked from home, updating spreadsheets and procedure manuals.  Although he could have continued to work from home, he was worried about a backlog of work piling up and staff not…
From UW Law School News: Wisconsin’s roots in the law-in-action tradition run deep, and the new Research Handbook on Modern Legal Realism could help that philosophy branch out at other law schools. Edward Elgar Publishing approached Beth Mertz, the John and Rylla Bosshard Professor Emerita, to edit the ambitious, 544-page project. She recruited co-editors Heinz Klug, Evjue-Bascom Professor of Law at UW, and Shauhin Talesh, a law professor at the University of California, Irvine. Beth Mertz Heinz Klug What UW calls “law in action” — how law is applied in the real world — is closely intertwined…
Today’s Inside Track from the Wisconsin State Bar introduces recent law grads to 5 Resources Every New Lawyer Should Know.  The article features resources from the WI State Bar and WI State Law Library and offers tips on finding court rules and procedures, jury instructions, local bar associations, CLE requirements. Written by Barbara Fritschel and Carol Hassler, the article is part of a series of Inside Track articles on legal research written by members of the Law Librarians Association of Wisconsin.…
In the US, the average email address is associated with 130 different online accounts, according to a study by DigitalGuardian.   By my count, I have about 500.  That’s a lot of passwords to manage. The same study also reported that 11% of users have only one default password that they use across most or all accounts and 30% rarely or never change their passwords.  Not so good.  However, most users were more security conscious.  40% reported never reusing passwords and 70% changed their passwords at least once per year. Password security is particularly important for attorneys notes law firm…
On the latest episode of the WI Law in Action podcast from the UW Law Library, host Kris Turner interviewed me, Bonnie Shucha, Associate Dean and Director of the Law Library.  I discuss my recent paper, “Representing Law Faculty Scholarly Impact: Strategies for Improving Citation Metrics Accuracy and Promoting Scholarly Visibility,” which I presented at the Yale Citation and the Law Symposium last month.  Below are a few excerpts from our discussion. On the upcoming U.S. News scholarly impact ranking and the representation problem: I think the most commonly stated concern about the U.S. News ranking is…
Contrary to assertions that senior faculty tend to be less productive, Inside Higher Ed reports that a new study of academic productivity says that older professors publish as much as their younger colleagues. These senior scholars do tend to publish fewer conference papers than younger colleagues but keep pace with them in terms of published articles, the paper says. Crucially, senior professors publish more chapters and books than their younger counterparts, reflecting the valuable synthesis of knowledge and insight gathered over the course of a career. The study also looked for differences between disciplines, dividing the faculty members’ fields into…