Wisblawg

Legal Research News and Information with an Emphasis on Wisconsin

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According to an email sent to registered users, WisconsinEye is implementing subscription-based access for all users of on-demand content effective February 22nd.  Although legislative and Supreme Court content will still be available live and for 24 hours following an event, on-demand access to the recorded video archive will now only be available to paid subscribers. If you’re not familiar with WisconsinEye, it is an independent non-government-funded State Capitol broadcast organization, operating much like C-SPAN at the national level.  It is an amazing resource for live and recorded Wisconsin legislative and Supreme Court activity.  I’ve found it to be…
On the latest episode of the WI Law in Action podcast from the UW Law Library, we talk with food law expert, Professor Steph Tai about two recently published articles: “In Fairness to Future Generations of Eaters” and “Legalizing the Meaning of Meat”. Both articles discuss food law and how the law preserves and defines food as we know it, as well as the intersection of climate change and food law. Professor Tai also touches on how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected food law.  Below are a few excerpts from our discussion. Tai on food heritage and climate change:…
In celebration of Black History Month, the UW Law Library has created a web display celebrating the accomplishments of Black members of the legal profession.  See the UW Black History Month site for more information on campus-wide virtual events. This display is the creation of the Law Library’s Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity Subcommittee and is the latest in a series of displays recognizing and celebrating diversity in the legal profession.  We’ve also celebrated Asian Pacific​ Islander Desi American ​Heritage Month, Latinx Heritage Month, Middle Eastern ​North African ​Heritage Month, and Native November. The Libraries at the University of Wisconsin-Madison…
Last week, I posted that the Wisconsin Jury Instructions are now freely available online from the Wisconsin State Law Library.  Since then, I’ve received additional clarification on the availability of the instructions via Fastcase, in print, and superseded and withdrawn instructions: Availability on Fastcase In addition to the State Law Library website, Wisconsin attorneys can also access the Wisconsin Jury Instructions via Fastcase through the State Bar of Wisconsin.  Previously, a separate subscription was required, but going forward, the Jury Instructions will be included in Fastcase as a benefit to all State Bar members. Fastcase is refunding the remaining subscription…
Last Friday, I attended an excellent CLE program on Ethics & Professionalism in Virtual Legal Environments – Judicial Perspectives sponsored by the UW Law School, Continuing Legal Education.  Judge Jason Rossell (Kenosha County Circuit Court) and Judge John Anderson (Bayfield County Circuit Court) discussed how the move to virtual courtrooms has affected courtroom decorum and the need to communicate specifically to the tribunal about new virtual-specific ethical concerns. Something that Judge Anderson said particularly resonated with me:  “Anything that you can do to make the judge’s job easier = Better outcomes for your clients.”  That struck me as a…
The Wisconsin Jury Instructions (Civil, Criminal, and Children’s) are now freely available online on the Wisconsin State Law Library website.  This is a result of a cooperative effort between the University of Wisconsin Law School, the State Law Library, and the Wisconsin Court System’s Office of Judicial Education. From the Wisconsin Court System press release: The law school, which has formally published the jury instructions for more than six decades, has determined that transitioning the jury instructions to a public digital platform is in the best interest of the legal community and the state. “For over six decades, the…
On the latest episode of the WI Law in Action podcast from the UW Law Library, election law expert Dean Dan Tokaji joins us to discuss free speech, the 2020 election, and the effect of misinformation on democracy.  Tokaji discusses two recent pieces: Truth, Democracy, and the Limits of Law, a 2020 Saint Louis University Law Journal article and #2DaysOut: Ten Things to Watch for on (and after) Election Day, a  contribution to the Election Law Blog published right before Election Day, 2020.  Below are a few excerpts from our discussion. Tokaji on the essential norms of our democratic system:…
Earlier this month, Bloomberg Law announced that it is offering free access to all legal aid organizations supported by the Legal Services Corporation.  See Dewey B Strategic for more on this partnership.  In Wisconsin, LSC supports Legal Action of Wisconsin, Inc. and Wisconsin Judicare, Inc.  See the map of other LSC supported organizations. Yesterday, Bloomberg Law also announced that it was also offering 90 days of complimentary access to lawyers who take pro bono cases through the Paladin platform. This offer applies to any pro bono lawyer, not just Paladin users.  Dewey B Strategic and LawSites offer additional…
Photographs can present powerful evidence, but beware of images that have been Photoshopped or otherwise manipulated.  How to Geek, Electrons, and FindLaw offer some tips on spotting an altered image: Images that look a little too perfect may reveal use of airbrushing Look beyond the subject of a photo for signs of warping, which is when someone uses a tool to grab an area of an image and move, shrink, or enlarge it Scan the image for patterns and repeated objects which may indicate cloning, or duplicating part of an image and pasting it over another part Missing…
On the latest episode of the WI Law in Action podcast from the UW Law Library, we talk with Professor Emeritus Stewart Macaulay, an internationally recognized leader of the law in action approach to the study of contracts – and an amazing storyteller. Macaulay’s legacy was recently highlighted in the new book, “Stewart Macaulay: Selected Works,” which contains some of his best-known research from the last 60 years, as well as some of his more obscure publications. Professor Macaulay on inspirations for the law in action approach to the study of contracts. I used the contracts casebook…
In response to new measures to enhance the safety of the campus community during the spring semester, on-site access to the UW Law Library will be limited to UW Law School students, faculty, and staff as of January 19, 2021. However, the Law Library remains committed to remotely supporting our campus and community members to the best of our ability.  Please contact our reference librarians using the chat now feature on our website, emailing  askuwlaw@law.wisc.edu, or calling 608-262-3394 for assistance.  Library cardholders can still request that Law Library materials be delivered to Memorial Library for pick up.  …
For a while now, HeinOnline has assigned topics to each article in the Law Journal Library database.  This allows researchers to get a general idea of the scope of the article before they dive in any further or to search or browse for additional articles on that topic.  Over 1,500 topics are available and are assigned using a combination of human curation along with natural language processing and machine learning, Hein recently announced that they had broadened this topical taxonomy.  The same topics are available, but they’re now organized into a logical hierarchy that allows users to drill down from…
Today, legal publishers Casemaker and Fastcase announced their merger thereby creating the largest legal research platform by subscriber count – over one million.  According to the press release: The two companies will combine their teams and technologies to innovate research, analytics, and workflow offerings that empower lawyers with powerful digital solutions for their clients. The two companies have taken a similar trajectory in creating an affordable and widely accessible alternative to the global publishers that dominate American law, offering subscriptions to bar associations, who subscribe on behalf of their members. Each company offers its subscribers different products, and this…
Here is the latest faculty scholarship appearing in the University of Wisconsin Law School Legal Studies Research Papers series found on SSRN. Targets of Opportunity? The History, Law and Practice of Affirmative Action in University Faculty Hiring by Jason W. Yackee Development is Not a Dinner Party: A Hurstian Perspective on Law and Growth in China by John K.M. Ohnesorge To access all the papers in the University of Wisconsin Law School Legal Studies Research Paper Series, please use the following URL: http://www.ssrn.com/link/u-wisconsin-legal-studies.html
The American Association of Law Libraries reports that academic librarians may now qualify for exemption from FOIA request fees as educational institution requestors.  From the AALL Washington Update: The  Office of Management and Budget (OMB) accepted AALL’s recommendation that federal agencies should consider librarians at educational institutions, including academic law librarians, as eligible for fee exemptions under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The FOIA requires federal government agencies to disclose government information upon request unless it falls under a specific exemption, such as to protect national security. Federal agencies are permitted to charge fees for responding to FOIA requests,…
On the latest episode of the WI Law in Action podcast from the UW Law Library, Professor R. Alta Charo, a leading expert in bioethics, discusses the development of COVID-19 treatments and vaccines and the procedural and legal issues that surround them.  She explores how vaccine distribution can be expected, how a vaccine gets approved, and how federal, state, and local laws and agencies come into play. Professor Charo on the role of government in research: What really made a difference in COVID-19 truly, was the research that wasn’t on COVID-19. It was the basic science research in genomics…