University of Wisconsin Law School

The University of Wisconsin Law School is located on historic Bascom Hill in the heart of the beautiful UW–Madison campus. It boasts a renowned faculty, an extensive curriculum and a dynamic student body. As part of a world-class university located in the state’s capital, the Law School also offers an unparalleled wealth of experiences beyond its walls.

Our curriculum emphasizes the dynamics of the law—how the law relates to social change and to society as a whole—while at the same time stressing skill development. In addition to nationally recognized programs in several substantive areas, the Law School also has one of the largest clinical programs in the country. UW Law School offers many dual degree programs, concentrations and certificate programs.

With a focus on skills-based learning, our students graduate practice-ready and prepared for success. Most UW Law School students are pursuing a J.D. (Juris Doctor) degree, while many others are earning an LL.M. (Master of Laws) or the S.J.D. (Doctor of Juridical Science).

The UW Law School's nationally recognized faculty and staff work together to provide an outstanding learning environment for our students. Our faculty and staff come from a wide range of backgrounds and bring varying experiences, views and approaches to the Law School. They are inspired by the UW’s distinctive law-in-action approach, and they are committed to helping students develop into confident, successful lawyers.

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From UW Law School News: A new book showcases the work of Stewart Macaulay, the University of Wisconsin Law School professor known for pioneering the “law-in-action” approach to contracts. “Stewart Macaulay: Selected Works“—edited by the leading British contracts scholar David Campbell—highlights Macaulay’s six decades of contributions to contract theory and to the sociology of law. The book contains some of Macaulay’s best-known research, as well as more obscure publications. Included in the book is Macaulay’s 1963 landmark work, “Non-Contractual Relations in Business: A Preliminary Study,” which would become one of the most cited in the law…
Legal Tune Up Wisconsin from LIFT Dane is a new app that uses publicly available data (driver’s license, criminal, eviction, court, and child support records) to help people identify and address legal issues on their own. From LawSites: In its initial launch, the app enables users to see if they have past eviction or criminal records on Wisconsin’s online public records database that are eligible for removal.  If so, the app automates creation and filing of the appropriate paperwork with the court to request removal (including sending the paperwork by regular mail). LIFT Dane, a social justice collaboration…
Today’s New Faculty Focus from UW News features one of UW Law’s newest professors, Franciska Coleman.  Coleman is an Assistant Professor of Law and Associate Director of the East Asian Legal Studies Program. Coleman has her J.D. from Harvard Law School and Ph.D. in Literacy, Culture and International Education from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to joining the faculty of UW Law School, she was a Visiting Assistant Professor at Washington University in St. Louis and also held a Visiting Scholar appointment at Harvard Law School. She also taught American Constitutional Law I and II at Yonsei Law School…
In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, the UW Law Library has created a web display celebrating the accomplishments of members of the Native community in the legal profession.  See the UW Madison Native November site for more information on campus-wide virtual events. This display is the creation of the Law Library’s Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity subcommittee and is the latest in a series of displays recognizing and celebrating diversity in the legal profession.  We’ve also celebrated Asian Pacific​ Islander Desi American ​Heritage Month, Black History Month, Latinx Heritage Month, and Middle Eastern ​North African ​Heritage Month. The Libraries at the University…
On the latest episode of the WI Law in Action podcast from the UW Law Library, Professor Cecelia Klingele discusses her work in the area of criminal justice reform, particularly on managing human behavior and conceptions of deviance.  She recently published two articles in this area: Labeling Violence published in the Marquette Law Review and Making Sense of Risk published in Behavioral Sciences and the Law. Professor Klingele on the use of actuarial risk assessment tools in criminal justice to predict whether individuals will engage in particular behavior: “It’s really essential that people within the criminal justice system, lawyers, judges,…
The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, guaranteeing and protecting the constitutional right to vote for women.  In honor of the anniversary, the American Bar Association’s Standing Committee on the Law Library of Congress launched a traveling exhibit tracing the movement that not only secured passage of the 19th amendment, but also its influence on subsequent movements related to equal rights. The UW Law Library is proud to host the 19th Amendment traveling exhibit which features archival images, mainly from the Library of Congress, and supporting text that tell the story of the…
Here is the latest faculty scholarship appearing in the University of Wisconsin Law School Legal Studies Research Papers series found on SSRN. Constructing Separate and Unequal Courtrooms by Ion Meyn, University of Wisconsin Law School Labeling Violence by Cecelia M. Klingele, University of Wisconsin Law School Making Sense of Risk by Cecelia M. Klingele, University of Wisconsin Law School The Strategic Ambiguity of the General Welfare Clause by David S. Schwartz, University of Wisconsin Law School Time for a Social Solidarity Tax? by Heinz Klug, University of Wisconsin Law School Back to the Future? Reclaiming Shareholder Democracy Through Virtual Annual
Here is the latest faculty scholarship appearing in the University of Wisconsin Law School Legal Studies Research Papers series found on SSRN. On the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) by Richard Bilder, University of Wisconsin Law School A New Federalism for Indian Tribes: The Relationship Between the United States and Tribes in Light of our Federalism and Republican Democracy by Richard Monette, University of Wisconsin Law School Between the Facts and Norms of Police Violence: Using Discourse Models to Improve Deliberations Around Law Enforcement by Franciska Coleman, University of Wisconsin Law School Separate is Inherently Unequal, Unless
“We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.” With these words, We began our lasting experiment with Democracy 233 years ago.  On Thursday, Sept. 17th, Americans celebrate Constitution Day and Citizenship Day.  A federal day of observance to commemorate the signing of the United States Constitution on September 17, 1787. In declaring the first Citizenship Day…
The UW Law Library recently received an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) National Leadership Grants for Libraries grant to improve access to tribal laws.  A recent news article from the UW Madison Libraries features our Digital Publication of Tribal Laws Pilot Project. From the article, University of Wisconsin-Madison Law Library: Empowering Libraries: The project will develop an open platform that will empower libraries to improve access to tribal laws published into the public domain and more fully serve the needs of diverse users – tribal members and leaders, legal, business, and government professionals, academic researchers and learners,…
Have you ever tried to contact a specific person at a business or other organization but didn’t know their email address?  Tracking down individual email addresses can be difficult, but there are a few tricks of the trade that can help.  A recent LLRX article offers some good advice. Do a Google search for the person’s name.  If you know where they work, use the “site or domain” field in Google Advanced to search the company’s web site for his or her first and last name. Search organization online directories in that industry or conference attendance lists. If the individual…
Here is the latest faculty scholarship appearing in the University of Wisconsin Law School Legal Studies Research Papers series found on SSRN. The Incoherent Justification for Naked Restraints of Competition: What the Dental Self-Regulation Cases Tell Us About the Cavities in Antitrust Law by Peter Carstensen Flipping the Script on Brady by Ion Meyn Mixing Legal Systems in the British Empire by Mitra Sharafi The Fallacy of Director Independence by Yaron Nili To access all the papers in the University of Wisconsin Law School Legal Studies Research Paper Series, please use the following URL: http://www.ssrn.com/link/u-wisconsin-legal-studies.html
If you’ve been following the new US News Scholarly Impact Ranking, you know that the exclusion of books and interdisciplinary works has been a major concern for many law scholars.  Last February, I posted about how Hein’s Integration with ORCID might help resolve that problem. In that post, I explained that Hein was developing processes to pull publication data for books and interdisciplinary articles from ORCID into HeinOnline.  Yesterday, Hein announced that publication records from ORCID have indeed now been integrated into in HeinOnline. So, by creating and adding publications to their ORCID profiles, law scholars can now…
I’m very pleased to share that the UW Law Library has reopened for the fall semester.  To learn about our many updates & safety measures to support research & learning, see our Law Library COVID FAQs. One of the biggest changes is that access will be primarily limited to current UW Law students, staff, and faculty.  However, other campus users, attorneys, and the general public may still use the Law Library collection. The best way to check out physical Law Library materials is to request transfer to Memorial Library for pick up by appointment.  You may also request…