University of Wisconsin Law School

The University of Wisconsin Law School is located on historic Bascom Hill in the heart of the beautiful UW–Madison campus. It boasts a renowned faculty, an extensive curriculum and a dynamic student body. As part of a world-class university located in the state’s capital, the Law School also offers an unparalleled wealth of experiences beyond its walls.

Our curriculum emphasizes the dynamics of the law—how the law relates to social change and to society as a whole—while at the same time stressing skill development. In addition to nationally recognized programs in several substantive areas, the Law School also has one of the largest clinical programs in the country. UW Law School offers many dual degree programs, concentrations and certificate programs.

With a focus on skills-based learning, our students graduate practice-ready and prepared for success. Most UW Law School students are pursuing a J.D. (Juris Doctor) degree, while many others are earning an LL.M. (Master of Laws) or the S.J.D. (Doctor of Juridical Science).

The UW Law School's nationally recognized faculty and staff work together to provide an outstanding learning environment for our students. Our faculty and staff come from a wide range of backgrounds and bring varying experiences, views and approaches to the Law School. They are inspired by the UW’s distinctive law-in-action approach, and they are committed to helping students develop into confident, successful lawyers.

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Paving the Way: the First American Women Law Professors, the long-awaited book by Herma Hill Kay, former Dean of UC Berkeley School of Law who passed away in 2017, tells the stories of the first fourteen female law professors at ABA- and AALS-accredited law schools in the United States. From Amazon: Paving the Way is filled with details, quiet and loud, of each of their lives and careers from their own perspectives. Kay wraps each story in rich historical context, lest we forget the extraordinarily difficult times in which these women lived. Paving the Way is not just…
One-box searching has come to HeinOnline and it’s a very nice improvement.  Now you can search all Hein content from a single box with drop-down options allowing you to specify your search intent.  Previously, your search was limited to a specific tab (full text, citation, catalog, or case law). According to the HeinOnline blog, this interface update retains all searching functionality. No previous searching capabilities have been removed.  Here are the drop down options: Just search for: Functions the same as the former “Full Text” tab, searching the full text of documents for your keyword(s). Users can also use…
In celebration of APIDA Heritage Month, the UW Law Library has created a web display celebrating the accomplishments of Asian, Pacific Islander, and Desi American members of the legal profession.  See the UW APIDA Heritage Month site for more information on campus-wide virtual events. This display is the creation of the Law Library’s Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity subcommittee and is the latest in a series of displays recognizing and celebrating diversity in the legal profession.  We’ve also celebrated Black History Month, Middle Eastern ​North African ​Heritage Month, Latinx Heritage Month, and Native November. The Libraries at the University of Wisconsin-Madison…
82% of law review articles have zero citations within the first five years.  82%.  This grim finding is from a recent study by Rob Willey and Melanie Knapp of George Mason University Law Library who reviewed nearly 250,000 law review articles published in HeinOnline from 2015-2019. Some articles, however, are cited significantly more often.  What makes these articles so special?  According to Willey and Knapp, there are several article characteristics that correlate to increased citations in legal scholarship.  Here are a few of them. Tips for Increasing Article Citations Write long articles The most cited law review articles were between…
Here’s a list of some of the many research sites and tools available from Google: Google Advanced – https://www.google.com/advanced_search Google Alerts – https://www.google.com/alerts Google Books – https://books.google.com Google Finance – https://www.google.com/finance Google Flights – https://www.google.com/flights/ Google Images – https://images.google.com Google News – https://news.google.com Google Patents – https://patents.google.com/ Google Scholar – https://scholar.google.com Google Shopping – https://shopping.google.com/ Google Social Search – https://www.social-searcher.com/google-social-search/ Google Translate – https://translate.google.com Google Trends – https://trends.google.com/ Google Videos – https://www.google.com/videohp
ScholarSift is a new resource that legal scholars and law librarians should keep an eye on.  Using artificial intelligence, it analyzes the text and citations of law journal articles to find other relevant law journal articles.  You can either search for articles already in the database or upload your own draft.  It’s designed to identify scholarship that you might otherwise have missed in the course of your research.  It’s currently in beta but is expected to publicly launch on April 12th. Here’s a screenshot of the analysis from my recent paper on Representing Law Faculty Scholarly Impact which I uploaded…
The Lillian Goldman Law Library at Yale Law School is hosting a free Virtual Symposium on Citation and the Law on April 22 and 23, 2021.  Registration is now open. The symposium will highlight the scholarship of law librarians and faculty interested in issues ranging from the US News and World Reports rankings for scholarly productivity, to link rot, to empirical research in the use of citations, and more.  Keynote speaker Fred Shapiro will set the stage with his paper “The Most-Cited Legal Scholars Revisited” to be published in the University of Chicago Law Review.  All the papers will be…
From UW Law School News: U.S. News and World Report has ranked UW Law School 29th among the nation’s law schools (tied with five other schools), the magazine announced today. The school was ranked 38th last year. “This ranking reflects the outstanding value that the University of Wisconsin Law School offers, as well as the excellent career outcomes of our recent graduates, the reputation of our faculty, and the credentials of our students,” says Dean Dan Tokaji. “Equally important – although more difficult to measure – is the inclusiveness and resilience of the Wisconsin Law community, which is poised to emerge…
As the calendar winds its way toward spring and the end of the semester approaches, Assistant Director for Public Services, Kris Turner recommends the following underutilized or overlooked gems to help law students finish the year on a high note: 1. Are you focused on Wisconsin-specific laws and procedures? Then without a doubt, you should check out Books Unbound, the digital collection of treatises and ‘brown binders’ that are relied on by practitioners across the state. You have free access as a law student! Just create a student associate account here and you get your access in a few short…
Clearbrief is a new brief analysis tool that uses AI to evaluate the strength of the arguments in a brief, identifying how well each sentence is supported by the cited source.  It functions as an add-in to Microsoft Word. From the website: Clearbrief automatically pulls up every factual and legal source you cite to in your draft, side by side with your writing, and points out mistakes in what you said vs. what your source says.  [It] instantly finds and links to the best record documents to support each sentence in the brief, while you write. When you’re done…
For the last few years, I’ve been following the issue of legal citation metrics and scholarly impact and visibility very closely.  I’m pleased to share that my new paper entitled, Representing Law Faculty Scholarly Impact: Strategies for Improving Citation Metrics and Promoting Scholarly Visibility is now available via SSRN.  I will be presenting the paper at the Yale Virtual Symposium on Citation and the Law on April 22 and 23, 2021.  Registration opens soon. Here’s the abstract: In February 2019, U.S. News and World Report announced that it would expand its Best Law Schools data to include a new scholarly…
On the latest episode of the WI Law in Action podcast from the UW Law Library, we talk with Anne Smith, Clinical Associate Professor of Law and Director of UW Law School’s Law & Entrepreneurship Clinic.  The L&E Clinic provides legal services to early-stage companies and new entrepreneurs and aims to positively impact the Wisconsin economy. Professor Smith discusses the work of the clinic, its current projects, how the pandemic has impacted startups, and much more.  Below are a few excerpts from our discussion. Smith on the characteristics of a typical L&E client: I’m not sure there is…
Here is the latest faculty scholarship appearing in the University of Wisconsin Law School Legal Studies Research Papers series found on SSRN. “Black Lives Matter: A Conversation on Health and Criminal Justice Disparities” by FRANCISKA COLEMAN (UW Law) and AVAL-NA’REE GREEN This article is written as a series of letters between a law professor and a medical doctor in reaction to the events surrounding the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement. The letters discuss the antebellum origins of health and criminal justice disparities and the cultural mistrust of doctors and law enforcement spawned by that history. The letters also…
In celebration of Middle Eastern North African Heritage month, the UW Law Library has created a web display celebrating the accomplishments of Middle Eastern and North African members of the legal profession.  Nationally, MENA Heritage Month is often celebrated in April, but UW-Madison has traditionally celebrated it in March. This display is the creation of the Law Library’s Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity subcommittee and is the latest in a series of displays recognizing and celebrating diversity in the legal profession.  We’ve also celebrated Asian Pacific​ Islander Desi American ​Heritage Month, Latinx Heritage Month, Native November, and Black History Month. The…
Looking for a research or white paper, conference proceeding, pre-print, or report but can’t find a copy in your library’s catalog or popular search engines?  Check out the new Internet Archive Scholar search index from the Internet Archive.  According to the Internet Archive Blogs, Internet Archive Scholar indexes over 25 million research articles and other scholarly documents preserved in the Internet Archive spanning from the eighteenth century to the present.  It includes content from the natural sciences, humanities, biomedicine, art, history, industrial research, government reports, and more. Content in this search index comes in one of three forms: public…
Here is the latest faculty scholarship appearing in the University of Wisconsin Law School Legal Studies Research Papers series found on SSRN. Final Report and Model Policy of the Police Body-Worn Camera Feasibility Review Committee by Keith A. Findley University of Wisconsin Law School with Tom Brown, Veronica Figueroa, Kim Jorgensen, Charles Myadze, and Luke B. Schieve Abstract Madison, Wisconsin, is in the midst of a bold new experiment in improving police/community relations. After four years of study, an ad hoc committee recommended 177 reforms designed to improve policing and community trust in police. Central to those…